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There’s no way I could look at the letter “T” and not think about Time as part of Spirituality.

I was reminded today about letting go of the pressures we place on ourselves toward achieving goals, completing projects, or meeting deadlines. Instead, it’s about creating an attitude of relying on the Universal Flow of Life to achieve all that is needed for our greatest Good…in Spirit Speed. This can be a difficult pill to swallow, especially if you’re determined to accomplish certain things by certain ages of life. It is for me.

I’m not sure exactly when it started, but I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with Time. I love it when I have more than I need or expect, and hate it when there doesn’t seem to be enough. Of course, this is totally ludicrous. Every second, minute, hour, and day are exactly the same length for every one of us. It’s what we stuff inside those allotments or leave empty that determine our level of foolishness in dealing with Time.

It’s easy for me to recognize when I’m going over the crazy edge of trying to do too much in too little Time or for too long a Time (that workaholic tendency). There are obvious signs of frustration: conciseness in my conversations; deep breaths to calm myself; spinning or moving from one project to another; being easily distracted to the point that I don’t accomplish as much as I could if I just focused on one task at a Time…to completion.

I have clocks in every room. Time is noted on the computer, the cell phone, and in the car. Rarely do I go anywhere without a watch on my clockwrist. My weekly presentations are rehearsed and all segments are well-planned to meet the expectations of Sunday’s service staying within the 60-minute hour. In a culture that seems to thrive on short attention spans and instant gratification, the idea of long walks, leisurely lunches, long-term projects, or relaxing vacations can seem almost foreign to many people, including me. Such ideas of balance and rest actually bring more anxiety as my mind tries to “catch up” with what I’m not doing in a moment of relaxation.

The truth is the concept of Time will be around long after I’ve left this too-busy craziness. My greatest triumph over Time is to have as much of it and for as long as I can. While I agree with George Bernard Shaw in being “…totally used up when I die…,” I would prefer not to accelerate the process. As I seek a more balanced life in the variety of activities I pursue (or not), that includes how much Time and energy I spend on each of them.

There are moments when I see the futility of trying to force Life into being what I demand it to be rather than seeing it for what it is: a beautiful series of unfolding moments filled with wonder and connection, love and joy, and the completion of those things that are most important in that moment or stage of life…they do get done…everything in its own Time by the hands doing the work. The rest is finished in Spirit Speed.

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