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In my early (young and naïve) adult life I saw no real advantage to having a good set of tires on my car. When money was tight, I’d even purchase “recaps” rather than real tires. I still got from point A to point B and saved a lot of cash in the process. Needless to say, I usually wasn’t the one in charge of maintaining the cars in the family. Many years later, however, after driving through snowstorms, rainstorms, off-road, back roads and highways, transporting children and grandchildren, and being able to experience a number of different vehicles in the process, I’m absolutely convinced that a good set of tires with thick and gripping tread is more important than the comfort of the driver’s seat or any other “extras” that attract us to buy a certain vehicle.

This was made particularly clear to me a couple of years ago when my husband and I were on a road trip through the Rocky Mountains…in March…in a blowing snowstorm…going downhill (faster than I preferred)…with a lot of other cars trying to do the same. My car was not aerodynamic; it was rather lightweight, too. Did I mention the blowing gale-force winds? We had never driven together in conditions like this or with me as the passenger. Yet we stuck to that frozen road better than in any machine I’d ever driven.

ImageThe man who sold us the all-wheel-drive car a few months earlier had also thrown in an almost-new set of snow tires and, being intelligent enough to put them on the vehicle by the first snow, we were now the benefactors of an amazing driving experience through the worst conditions ever! Our path was so securely held by those tires, that we confidently and fearlessly journeyed forward. No subsequent conditions ever stopped us from traveling to our destination.

“It’s important to have the right tools for the job,” my dad had told me more than once. Again, life (and my income) didn’t always provide everything exactly as I wanted or needed, so sometimes I had to improvise. That could mean a project would take longer or not look as good as I had pictured in my mind. It might even result in unnecessary aches and pains due to the exertion of more muscle than I would have expended if I’d only had the right tool in the first place.

Having the right tool for the job DOES make a big difference, even if there’s a learning curve to using it. The project gets done more efficiently, looks more professional, and you often don’t have to buy additional materials to replace the ones you messed up the first time (or two) due to improvising. It’s an experience that benefits you in numerous ways. You grow through the process, perhaps learning patience along with new skills. There’s that sense of accomplishment when it’s done correctly. The right tools give you power to create your vision!

So what about toes? They do serve more than one purpose, according to experts. First they provide balance to the body. In addition, extensive, scientific testing shows that they help accelerate the running function in conjunction with the heel and the ankle. I’m content for the balance aspect (and being able to squeeze my toes into mud in the summer garden).

What is the purpose of all this “Tires, Tools and Toes” stuff? All of them relate to Divine Source (you knew there was a connection)…and can serve as our reminder when performing routine tasks.

  • Like the tires…when I’m firmly grounded and living with a deep belief of my connection to God, grounded in my beliefs, I don’t swerve or waiver in my life’s purpose and intentions to express fully, confidently and fearlessly as I journey ever forward in this world.
  • When I use the right tools to keep my life working properly – tools like meditation, studying, praying – my consciousness expands and I powerfully co-create with Spirit a life filled with joy, happiness, abundance, and love.
  • As for the toes, I pay attention to the little things in life so I can stay in balance. As I simplify my material wants, my needs are generously provided. Along the way, I take time for fun.

 Everything has purpose and meaning. Today, this is mine.

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